The Nine Circles ov… January 2016

Photo courtesy of our Dæmoness of Design, Jaci Raia.
Photo courtesy of our Dæmoness of Design, Jaci Raia. For more of her beautiful work follow her on Instagram.

January saw a TON of killer releases. In fact, early 2016 has me believing that this year might be the best overall year for metal releases that we have seen in some time. So today I decided to take a look back at January and mention nine releases that you may have missed but should absolutely take the time to get to know better. This should be a monthly piece moving forward. Each month I will recap nine releases from the prior month that were well wroth checking out. Obviously this list isn’t conclusive and it might not always just be THE BEST music. If it was merely the best music released Chthe’ilist’s debut Le Dernier Crépuscule would be above and away the #1. The idea is to present music that flew somewhat under the radar in relation to how simply great it is.  Continue reading

Initial Descent: January 15, 2016

Welcome back to Initial Descent! There’s finally enough new stuff dropping this week to make a post out of! Plus, definitely had to get back in the swing ahead of next week’s slate of new releases, which promises to be absolutely ridiculous. Anyway, we’ve got some death, some funeral doom, some black…a little of everything this week. So check out our highlights after the jump:
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Album Review: Lycus – “Chasms”

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Following the release of their excellent 2013 debut Tempest, CA-based doom outfit Lycus quickly emerged as a serious contender in the saturated field of low-and-slow bands from the West Coast. They return this year with their sophomore effort Chasms, which demonstrates a natural progression from their debut without rehashing any previous ideas and engulfs listeners in a tidal wave of doom with occasional throttles of swirling blackened chaos. With the band raising the bar on every aspect of their sound —dynamic songwriting, rock-solid performances, and a production fitting the massive scope of their sound—Chasms has a perfect quotient of orthodoxy to inventiveness.  Continue reading