Album Review: Inter Arma – “Garbers Days Revisited”

Goddamn I love a good cover.  There’s something so humanizing about having a band bare their influences to the world, and whether they choose to do something that reinvents a classic or they simply let loose and jam to one of their favorites, it’s so refreshing and a much-needed break from the temptation to always put up a serious front.  Enter Inter Arma and their new covers album Garbers Days Revisited, which lets loose with a wide range of covers, inclusive of everything from Venom to Neil Young to Prince and Tom Petty, but never gives up the good-time vibes. Continue reading

Album Review: Moonlight Desires – Just the Hits (1981-1985)

Moonlight Desires - Just the Hits

Sometimes we get so caught up in what’s considered “metal” or not we forget how little genre tags and labels mean when it comes to how music makes you feel.  I’ll admit to getting caught up in discussions over distinctions between metalcore and NWOAHM, how far the “post-” label can go before metal get thrown out all together…but when I take a breath, close my eyes and open my ears, in the end all I want is loud guitars that crunch, a voice that soars, and tight, tight songs.  I know when I take off the black t-shirts and corpsepaint, what I really want is something fun.  I want Just the Hits (1981-1985), and if they’re performed by Moonlight Desires?

All the better.   Continue reading

The Nine Circles ov… Cover Songs (Part I)

In an act of ultimate blasphemy, I’m gonna quote the Bible here on Nine Circles real quick: “there is nothing new under the sun.” In a way, it’s a shitty admission. As appreciators, and especially as artists, we want to believe there’s always something new out there waiting to be discovered. We want to find it, capture it, channel it into something that’s ours. If you believe there’s nothing new under the sun, that every original artistic impulse has already been conceived and acted out, then you cede that impulse to your creative forebears. But can that idea not be freeing? If everything worth imagining has already been imagined, then the burden comes off of you to blaze any new trails. You’re free to reinterpret, to reimagine, to outright fucking steal the shit that came before you. And what’s interesting about this notion (or depressing, or really awesome, depending on your viewpoint) is that it sells. We can be sly about this. We can write books that we call “bold retellings” of works written centuries ago. We can be overt about it. We, as Hollywood producers, can say, “What if we just did Die Hard, but in the White House? Or London?” We can say, “this made a lot of money as a comic. Let’s make it a movie.” And that’s the prevailing atmosphere in popular commercial art now. Continue reading