Blood Red: Hooptober 9.0: Week Two

blood red week 2

We’re back on our normal roll, chopping off five films this week and slipping in the gore of the moment. As promised after the fun of X I went back to the beginning to revisit The House of the Devil, Ti West’s debut. Then it was off to happy place, visiting two slices of Hammer horror with The Gorgon and The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll. There’s a slight detour into animation with the wonderful Poe anthology Extraordinary Tales before settling in with one of the progenitors of the form, the 1925 Phantom of the Opera.

As always you can read the full reviews over at Cinema Dual. In the meantime, smoke ’em if you got ’em…

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The Nine Circles Playlist Vol. 250 (9.24.2022)

Well whaddaya know? We made it to 250. This is the 250th edition of the Nine Circles Playlist and since it’s our party we’ll invite who want to, you know?

So you’re gonna hear stuff like the new Venom, Inc. which is killing anything Cronos might be doing (although thanks for releasing the In Nominee Satanas set on CD) and Gaerea who just released a killer new record, as did the noise kings KEN mode. But that’s not all! How about some vicious preview tracks from the likes of Autopsy and Scars of the Flesh? Or maybe you’re feeling like it’s an indie weekend? We got you some older tunes by Pianos Becomes the Teeth and Catherine Wheel to soundtrack your vibe. Lest you turn away there’s still plenty of heavy to be had with music from Ashen, Aenaon, Ultar, and a bevy of classic metal tracks to close things out from the likes of DBC, Sodom, Morbid Angel and Vader.

Get listening. Stay safe. See you next week.

Chris

Blood Red: Hooptober 9.0: Week One

It may seem like a slow start to 2022’s edition of the Hooptober Marathon, but in my defense it didn’t kickoff until Thursday this year, and I’m leaving for a baptism this morning so I only got four films in for Week One. Not too bad though, because we kick off with the silent classic The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, move on up to some delicious YA horror courtesy of executive producer Guillermo del Toro with Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, then move on to a 70s oddity that’s much better than its name – Mako: The Jaws of Death – implies before ending with Ti West’s breakout sensation X.

We’re already making some slight changes to the list (now that I’m all in on X I might revisit some Ti West films and catch Pearl while it’s in theaters) so let’s jump into those quick summaries and see if anything grabs you and drags you under the bed. This year you can read the full reviews over on Cinema Dual, the site I share with my buddy Jon. In the meantime, smoke ’em if you got ’em…

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The Nine Circles Playlist Vol. 249 (9.17.2022)

You know what it is. I’m too tired and too hung over to get a more pithy introduction out for the 249th edition of the Nine Circles Playlist, so let’s just get to the music, huh?

A lot of new music out this week, but I keep finding myself drawn back to the latest from Mork, who kill it with their raw, atmospheric black metal. We also have the debut from Sonja finally in our hands, and I may have more to say about that next week, pairing them off with the wicked retro thrash of Transgressive. We also have new music from Lorna Shore, Wolfheart, Trocar, the Anitchrist Imperium, Dream Unending, Woods of Desolation, AWS, Behemoth, and Psychonaut, not to mention a killer classic of post punk from Pink Turns Blue.

Get listening. Stay safe. See you next week.

Chris

Album Review: Bloodbath — “Survival of the Sickest”

Bloodbath - Survival of the Sickest

If you needed any more evidence that Bloodbath were serious about getting back into the vintage, old school death metal sound that catapulted them into the metal conversation as more than just a “supergroup” take a look at that album title. It’s not enough that Survival of the Sickest, the band’s latest offering uses a sickly blue tint to stand out against the putrid, vomitous yellow theme of the album art, but – just like Molder earlier this year – we have that wonderful Arial font, complete with quotation marks. It’s indicative of the return to a deeper, squishier version of death metal, one that eschews its supergroup status to just get back to making some serious fun death metal.

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