Exclusive Stream: Uburen – “I Hail”

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With Halloween lying just around the bend, Norwegian black metallers Uburen are set to release their second album, Frå døden fødes livTwo years removed from their debut Withered Roots, this nine-track collection offers a take on pagan black metal that’s traditionally raw yet features a healthy dose underlying melodic elements. In anticipation of this release, “I Hail” is available for stream below.

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As evidenced below, influences can be tied back to black metal pioneers Enslaved and Bathory, among others. While perhaps not replicating any specific genre directly, Uburen has created a unique intensity around their brand of black metal that simultaneously pays tribute to the genre’s beginnings. Given what we have heard so far, there is plenty to look forward to come Halloween.


 Frå døden fødes liv will be available on October 31st through Via Nocturna and be purchased here. Additionally, the previously released track “I Become” is also available for streaming. For more information on Uburen, visit their official Facebook page.


 

Manny’s Magical Genre Guide: Black Metal

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Iconic photo from the basement of Euronymous’s record shop Helvete located in Norway. The basement housed his independent record label “Deathlike Silence Productions”

Directly from the depths of hellish, white teen angst was born the fiery brand of metal known simply as “black metal.” Exactly who coined the term first and which band used it properly is up for debate. What isn’t up for debate is how pervasive the genre has been in extreme metal since the early 1980s. While developing mostly in Scandinavia the movement has eventually spread into Europe proper, Asia, the Balkans and the Americas—becoming a global phenomenon. Associated with black metal are plenty of non-musical elements including the legendary use of corpse paint, stage names and extreme secrecy as well as some illegal activities such as church burning, violent assault and murder. It should be noted that while plenty of black metal has been heavily criticized for its white power, Nazi-like lyrics and penchant for hate (more on that later) that doesn’t define the genre nor limit the thematic leanings. Continue reading

Album Review: Occult Burial – “Hideous Obscure”

When a cover like the one pictured above arrives in your inbox any metal writer should be given pause. First of all, it’s awesome. Second of all, that logo rules. Third, there’s a badass skull front an center (with teeth). Finally, there’s some heavily studded armbands. Now, can this band deliver? Because that is one hell of a first impression. I’ll hand it to them, they back it the ‘f’ up. Occult Burial are not only obsessed with sick covers but they also love speed riffs, thrash metal and some old school butchery. Thus, Hideous Obscure is more than just a pretty cover to hang above your toilet. It’s a “take no prisoners” style of album that’s sure to bash in the hood of your neighbors car all while you are asleep. Continue reading

The Nine Circles ov… Darkthrone

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Along with Bathory, Mayhem and a handful of other acts, Darkthrone is one of the most commonly recognized and iconic black metal bands of all time. And though they’ve moved through multiple musical phases — death metal, black metal, crust/punk/thrash, classic metal — one clear element shines through every record: Fenriz and Nocturno Culto are extremely passionate and devoted to creating good metal music. For me, discovering the band has fit the ideal story of heavy metal fandom. I first saw their album covers in a friend’s collection, and was enamored with the dark imagery and the whole mystique (the names, the corpse paint, etc.). I checked out a few songs, got a couple records, and since then it’s been the long journey of exploring each record and building up a set of favorite songs. Nine of those are listed below. Continue reading

Album Review: Temple of Baal – “Mysterium”

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It can take a band some time to find its footing. For France’s Temple of Baal it took about sixteen years. What put them over the top was finding their own sound—which is heavily atmospheric and very conducive to methodical and stress relieving head banging. The touches of atmosphere on Mysterium combined with excellent production and more restraint than Temple of Baal have previously shown makes for a fantastic foray into an abyss of dark occultism. Continue reading