Album Review: Imperial Triumphant – “Vile Luxury”

Imperial Triumphant - Vile Luxury

Every once in a while, an inventive style of music full of creative vitriol and an album representative of its sound and ethos comes to encapsulate the character and essence of New York City, captured in time and place. Like music, the City keeps on evolving, mutating, shedding its skin and confronting its internal parasites as part of a grand struggle between a glorious past, the crossroads of the present and the paradigm shift and rebirth looming on the horizon, so bright and violent that it burns retinas. In 2018, Imperial Triumphant take up the torch and joins this lineage with Vile Luxury. Continue reading

CANTO: Bloodbath, Anaal Nathrakh, Misery Index and more!

bloodbath band photo

Oh hey, it’s me! Yep, I still have time to do these things sometimes. Like, once in a blue moon. Apparently, nursing school and a complete absence from social media aren’t conducive to consistent metal blogging. Who knew? Anyway, we’re already late on this, so I’ll shut up. Here’s some stuff you might have missed from today:

Album Review: Pyrolatrous – “Teneral”

pyrolatrous teneral

In a world of regional scenes with established sounds, the scene in New York City seems to only be defined by its inability to be tied down.  From black metal like Yellow Eyes to the sci-fi technical death metal of Artificial Brain, one can find any number of different styles represented among the bands that call this densely populated city home.  Now seeing fit to join this illustrious ranks is Pyrolatrous, who are set to release their debut album Teneral on the population at large.   Continue reading

Album Review: Geryon – “The Wound and the Bow”

Geryon-Woundhr

Jazz influenced metal is not a combination that is likely to knock your socks off in amazement. Shining exist as an example of free jazz inspired metal. Hedvig Mollestad Trio continue to put out quality works of guitar forward, jazz with a heavy feel. Further, Oranssi Pazuzu has led the charge of metal bands leaning in the jam band direction. So experimentation, particularly with jazz rhythms and riffs is not something to be shocked over (especially not when the band is from New York City the home of legendary experimentalists Pyrrhon). The way in which Geryon employs their influence is, however, something new. While not the most accessible or palatable record of the year, The Wound and the Bow is certainly an interesting listen worth the roughly forty-five minutes of your time. Continue reading