Receiving the Evcharist: Primitive Man and Come Heavy or Not at All

Receiving the Evcharist 2018

Rarely do we actually find a drink that perfectly pairs with the tunes at hand, but this time I think we’ve managed the perfect pairing, if you can survive to the end of it.  Receiving the Evcharist is our weekly feature where we pair choice albums with our favorite libations.  Drink from the cup of heresy.  This week’s offering: Primitive Man’s Insurmountable and Hubbard’s Cave’s Come Heavy or Not at All.

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Album Review:  Cavernlight — “As I Cast Ruin Upon The Lens That Reveals My Every Flaw”

Wisconsin natives and sludge/doom metal lords Cavernlight have returned after five long years with a stellar sophomore release—As I Cast Ruin Upon The Lens That Reveals My Every Flaw.  If you are already familiar with this band, you know that they do not skimp on album titles.  As this release’s poetic title suggests, the album is full of angsty darkness that is sure to appeal to neurodivergent metal fans such as myself.  While the tunes are crushingly heavy, there is a catharsis to it resulting in a beautifully expressive album which will resonate with many listeners.  As I Cast Ruin… brings everything Cavernlight offered in their debut while expanding on soundscapes and programming created movements.  There are no dull moments and many unique compositions to make this album one-of-a-kind and an excellent continuation of the band’s journey.

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Profile: Michael Kadnar and Lulu Black of This Is Oblivion

This Is Oblivion
Image courtesy of Sarah Adler

This Is Oblivion are on the eve of releasing their self-titled debut and if dark, moody, captivating, and heavy as lead (not talking pig squeals and pinch harmonics here) are considered a good time, run and don’t walk to get your copy now. The duo of Michael Kadnar and Lulu Black have on their hands a debut release that winds effortlessly through doomy dirges, dark folk, industrial tinges, and whip smart lyrics with extremely engrossing and catchy song craft. No doubt comparisons have, and will, be made to Chelsea Wolfe but that’s only a small piece of the pie. The album is “an exploration of the cyclical nature of connection” which is heard throughout as the songs play out like draining seasons or the feeling of meeting new friends or the nature of losing someone close. I said before this album is engrossing and that’s putting it lightly, it tugs at the deep recesses of the brain and soul and not only creates a connection but begs for further exploration. Just ahead of the album’s release we posed our set of Profile questions to pull back the curtain a little and gain more knowledge of this project so read on to see how it went down and be sure to grab a copy via the links contained within.

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Album Review: Darkher — “The Buried Storm”

A figure draped in black moving lightly and slowly, barefoot, through a moonlit mossy forest.  Smog curls from the end of a smudge bundle as a smokey scent trails through the earthy air.  Listening to doom/dark folk band Darkher (passion project of the very talented Jayn Maiven) brings this imagery to mind and their latest release The Buried Storm urges this dark beauty to unfold and encapsulate listeners.  Fans have waited six long years for a sophomore release from Darkher and this album does not disappoint.  The songs contain a melancholic heaviness that Maiven previously established in earlier releases, while also expanding to include guest string musicians and creating vast well-developed soundscapes that intwine perfectly with her hauntingly ethereal vocals.

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