Profile: Joel Violette of Thrawsunblat

thrawsunblat band photo

Upon each new release from Canada’s Thrawsunblat, the band are no strangers to multiple coverage opportunities and for good reason; their output is always top-notch. For their latest, IV: Great Brunswick Forest, we recently featured an interview of the band (spoiler: the answers were as wildly entertaining as the surprising acoustic direction of said album) and are still spinning IV regularly around these halls. Joel Violette was kind enough to return once more to answer our set of Profile questions in which we dive into beginnings, Bandcamp, positivity, new material and so much more. If you haven’t heard the album yet, hit the embedded stream and by all means click the links below to get a copy of this album in your hands. Without further delay, head inside to see what Joel had to say. Continue reading

Interview: Joel Violette of Thrawsunblat on “Great Brunswick Forest,” Musical Reinterpretation, and How to Spot a Moose in the Wild

thrawsunblat band photo

Over the course of three albums and a handful of EPs, Thrawsunblat have carved a space for themselves in the genre of black metal by integrating the Maritime folk of their home province of New Brunswick, Canada. With their newest album Great Brunswick Forest, which is out October 19, the trio of Joel Violette, Rae Amitay and Keegan MC immerse themselves and their listeners wholeheartedly into that Maritime folk. Careful listeners of the band’s discography should recognize the familiar elements that make Thrawsunblat what it is, and yet this does feel like a big step forward. We reached out to Joel to talk about the creative process for the new album, his fascination with re-interpreting songs and also a bit of Maritime tourism. Continue reading

The Path to Paradise Begins in Hell – Folk Metal

The Path to Paradise Begins In Hell

Last month, I discussed my love for industrial metal, and how one song shaped my entire adolescence before I fully landed in the German camp of industrial metal. Since writing the column, the song “Bye/Die” has become more prevalent as of late, as I am knuckles-deep into grad school and I haven’t had time to breathe. Thus, what better way to fully curse being a full-time student and being split in various camps than by humming a song about hoping some entities – in this case, my institution and select members of my immediate family – would fuck off and die?

If you can’t tell by now, humans have a tendency to categorize things because we like heuristics (shortcuts), and I am doing this because I like to organize what I know into small piles of easy-to-access information.

Also, for that one person who suggested other bands to check out: I do not consider Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson metal. They may be industrial and metal-like, but they are not metal to me. Like I have stated previously, labels are subjective, and while they do tend to crossover, I came to Nine Inch Nails later in life. As to the others, I might check them out, but we shall see.

Speaking of coming to things later in life, the next genre I want to explore is one that I came into because of fandom. While I never thought to involve myself into another fandom after what happened with symphonic metal, I watched from the sidelines while people talked about bands in this genre.

It’s time we talk about folk metal. Continue reading

Album Review: MaterDea – “Pyaneta”

MaterDea - Pyaneta

Over the years, symphonic metal has remained stagnant, allowing bands that have remained in the game to continue releasing albums while new, fledgling bands have to stand out by incorporating new elements in the tried-and-true method of operatic vocals and death growls. In short, it’s a battleground where bands have to prove they have staying power. Now, that doesn’t mean that bands have to add new things in order to stand out – sometimes, having the same formula in your albums is better than throwing different elements at the wall to see what sticks. In the case of MaterDea, their fifth release Pyaneta does a little bit of both, eventually changing into something more cohesive and consistent. Continue reading

Receiving the Evcharist: Wayfarer and Seafarer

Receiving the Evcharist

Receiving the Evcharist is our weekly feature where we pair choice albums with our favorite libations.  Drink from the cup of heresy.  This week’s offering: Wayfarer’s World’s Blood and Three Weavers Brewing Company’s Seafarer Kolsch-Style Ale.   Continue reading