Profile: Michael Kadnar and Lulu Black of This Is Oblivion

This Is Oblivion
Image courtesy of Sarah Adler

This Is Oblivion are on the eve of releasing their self-titled debut and if dark, moody, captivating, and heavy as lead (not talking pig squeals and pinch harmonics here) are considered a good time, run and don’t walk to get your copy now. The duo of Michael Kadnar and Lulu Black have on their hands a debut release that winds effortlessly through doomy dirges, dark folk, industrial tinges, and whip smart lyrics with extremely engrossing and catchy song craft. No doubt comparisons have, and will, be made to Chelsea Wolfe but that’s only a small piece of the pie. The album is “an exploration of the cyclical nature of connection” which is heard throughout as the songs play out like draining seasons or the feeling of meeting new friends or the nature of losing someone close. I said before this album is engrossing and that’s putting it lightly, it tugs at the deep recesses of the brain and soul and not only creates a connection but begs for further exploration. Just ahead of the album’s release we posed our set of Profile questions to pull back the curtain a little and gain more knowledge of this project so read on to see how it went down and be sure to grab a copy via the links contained within.

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Nine Circles ov…Clearing Out This Week’s Promo Pile

The last time I did something like this was back in 2018, but maybe I need to do it more. With so much music coming out it’s easy to just sit back and cherry pick the albums you’re already anticipating and write about it. And as many of our staff focus on things other than review writing (thank the heavens for the consistent and consistently excellent output of Ian) I suspect we’re missing out on a lot of great music that just isn’t getting the attention here at Nine Circles it should. So, foolish as it may seem I called out to Fearless Editor Josh™ with my request: give me nine promos for albums coming out this week, and I’ll listen and give some semblance of commentary for them. Ambitious? Perhaps. Stupid? Almost certainly. But if it gets some visibility for some bands and gets me attuned to some new music instead of constantly digging into the bins for rock and prog circa ’69-’74 all the better. So for this edition of Nine Circles ov... let’s take a look at some of the music coming out this week.

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Album Review: Lord Agheros — “Koinè”

Lord Agheros - Koine

Imagine this: a lingua franca, a common language/sound, for black metal – something that unites the waves of the genre throughout the years by following a single, linear sound. While I personally think there is nothing common about black metal, since there is enough variability to keep you rooted on the spot, something unites the genre more and more outside of its sound. Could it be the way that music is presented to new listeners? Could it be that all black metal comes from one ancestor that has since expanded into what we know, write, and listen to today? Could it be the academic interest that has led to an exploration of the genre in a sociological perspective? Lord Agheros’s Koinè (Greek for “common”) aims to explore all of these questions musically, as several different dialects (or musical influences, in this scenario) have become part of the black metal blueprint nowadays.

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Album Review:  Mur — “Cut The Rivers Vein”

Heavy doom riffs, wailing clean vocals, menacing growls, sludge textures, black metal interludes, and dark acoustic folk guitar—what more could a girl want?  Mur has delivered all of these eclectic elements into the six-track album Cut The Rivers Vein and I am here for it.  Even more impressive than this combination and the music itself is the fact that it was all created by one individual.  Cam Sather is the mastermind behind Mur and his latest release is a creative cumulation of heavy Romantic-era themes, quiet folk passages, hypnotic soundscapes, and head-banging metal dramatics.

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Rainbows in the Dark: Osi and the Jupiter — “Stave”

I don’t think I will ever quite forget the first time I heard Appalachia.  It was not my first exposure to Osi and the Jupiter, but it was definitely the moment where everything clicked.  That moment specifically was “They Ride Through the Sky on Horse Drawn Chariots,” where I finally realized just how incredibly special their music could be, and just how deeply transcendent of an experience listening to it is.  Even though it was only three songs, I did wonder how the next release from the duo would fare in terms of keeping that momentum going.  Wonder no more: Stave provides a sturdy bridge that connects the band’s past to the bright future ahead of them.

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